Churches remain at the heart of offering help to homeless people at Christmas, according to latest report by National Christian Charity

Nearly 2,000 people were welcomed into church and community based Winter Night Shelters across England and Wales in 2015, according to a new report, published this morning (Tuesday 20th December) by the National Christian Homeless Charity, Housing Justice.

In its fourth year of reporting activity, the Housing Justice Night Shelter Impact Report demonstrates the vital contribution made by churches and faith communities when it comes to Night Shelters and the guests they faithfully serve.

A study of Church and Community Night Shelters shows homeless guests were accommodated in over 500 venues last winter with more expected to be accommodated in this current season.

A total of 1920 guests visited the night shelters during the season, a slight reduction in the number of the previous year of 2171, with anecdotal evidence that this is partially because some guests are staying for longer.

In the report, it also shows volunteers gave 490,063 hours of volunteer time to Church and Community Night Shelters; an average of 14,850 hours per shelter. This is an increase on the previous year of more than 112% on the previous year.

The estimated value of the time according to these figures is £6174,805, based on ONS average earnings figures.

Whilst regretful of the need for Night Shelters, Housing Justice is seeking to give thanks for the work of thousands of volunteers across the country.

Encouraging churches to set up more Winter Night Shelters in their own area, the Bishop of Edmonton, the Rt Revd Rob Wickham has been invited to become the first Housing Justice Night Shelter Ambassador.

As part of his new role, the Bishop of Edmonton, the Rt Revd Rob Wickham, will be joining local volunteers at the Night Shelter based at St Dionis Church in Parson’s Green in the Diocese of London this evening.

During the visit, Bishop Rob will meet with trustees and staff from Glassdoor, London’s largest emergency winter night shelter, who partner with St Dionis to run its Night Shelter.

The St Dionis shelter provides life-sustaining food and shelter between November and March each year. Volunteers and partners work closely to provide dignity-restoring support to help men and women find solutions to their homelessness.

In response to the latest Night Shelter report from Housing Justice, the Rt Revd James Langstaff, Bishop of Rochester and Chair of Housing Justice Trustees, said:

“This report highlights the continuing and growing need for Night Shelters. While this fact is no cause for celebration – rather the opposite – it is very good that an increasing number of Shelters have sought the Housing Justice Quality Mark over the last 12 months. The Night Shelters team at Housing Justice supports and equips local faith communities across England and Wales to offer the highest possible quality of provision. The team looks forward to awarding the Quality Mark to more projects in the coming months.

Each Night Shelter is an expression of God’s love in action, providing dignity for the most vulnerable in our communities. I am deeply grateful to all those volunteers who give of themselves so willingly through the work of the Shelters. They work unsociable hours, offering food, shelter and other practical care; they embody love for neighbour and generosity of heart.

Whatever the politics around homelessness, the church’s calling puts Christians at the centre of this loving service.”

The shelters typically run between November and March and involve a circuit of churches, community groups and places of worship of different faiths and denominations, each taking a designated night of the week to provide shelter on their premises to between 12 and 35 guests. Each shelter provides an evening meal and a bed for the night, and breakfast in the morning.

Author of this year’s Impact report, Jacob Quagliozzi, Deputy Director of Housing Justice, said:

“This year Housing Justice Night Shelter Impact Report shows the excellent work that Christians across the whole of England and Wales are doing to support those who are in great need this Christmas from homeless.

This new report shows that, whilst there has been a drop in the number of guests being hosted by churches in this last shelter season, there will certainly be a significant increase in this current season.

Appointing Bishop Rob as the first Housing Justice Night Shelter Ambassador is a demonstration from Housing Justice that we are keen to celebrate what Christians are already doing, but look at where the gaps are for us to see more Night Shelters beginning to emerge. Bishop Rob is an excellent example of someone who believes passionately in seeing Church and Community Based Night Shelters in localities and we hope his appointment will encourage people to nag their own Bishop to lead from the front as the church keeps homeless as a priority, in both word and deed!”

END

Notes to editors:

The Church and Community Night Shelter Network Impact Report collected data from 33 shelters in areas including London, Birmingham, Rugby, Ipswich, Folkestone, Bradford, Reading, Aldershot, Nottingham, Cardiff, and High Wycombe.

Members of Housing Justice staff are available for interview.

All press enquiries should be directed to Adam May on 07736 949 869 or a.may@housingjustice.org.uk

It is sixty years since two Catholic women, Maisie Ward and Molly Walsh, decided that something practical needed to be done to prevent homelessness and help families and individuals into secure affordable accommodation. Maisie Ward was a writer, theologian and the daughter of a prominent Catholic publisher. Molly Walsh and her husband, Bob, ran a House of Hospitality during the depression.  Molly and Maisie met through the Catholic Evidence Guild. They shared a concern about the needs of young families in Britain after the war. Especially as they saw the damage done to children who were being brought up in dreadful slum conditions and the lasting impact on family life. Molly and Maisie joined forces to persuade the Catholic Church to respond to the needs of people who were homeless or living in poverty – a witness of the Catholic community to the problem, but a service to the entire community.

Over the years many Catholics, usually married women, up and down the country, joined forces with Maisie and Molly to run support and advice services from their homes. That was the birth of CHAS, the Catholic Housing Aid Society. In the early days they raised money to buy parish-based houses to convert into flats for families in need.  They also raised money for people to use as a deposit on a home and, indeed, often secretly guaranteed the loan. They brought together groups of volunteer professionals, such as bank managers and surveyors, to give free advice to low income families who were trying to move into home ownership but were experiencing difficulty in finding reliable, honest and affordable advice.    And they established half-way houses, where people could rent accommodation for a few years, but the rent they paid included a compulsory “savings” element which was returned to them at the end of their tenancy so they had a lump sum to use as a deposit on a property.

Sixty years on Housing Justice, as the successor organisation to CHAS, continues to work to meet a need that is tragically, just as great today. As part of the sixtieth anniversary celebrations we are re-issuing “Homelessness: a fact and a scandal” first published in 1990. The problem described then is very similar to the problem as it exists today – but the political and social context in which we are operating is very different. There have been huge changes in attitudes to poverty and to the role of the state as provider of a welfare safety net. But there has also been a big increase in the number of church linked projects, like the winter night shelters Housing Justice supports, and in the number of volunteers from faith communities of all stripes who want to do something to make a real difference. The times are ripe for change.

So maybe, just maybe this is the time when the battle to end homelessness in England is about to make another leap forward. There are three developments that I present in evidence.

The first is the CLG committee’s Homelessness Inquiry. This is an in depth look at the causes of homelessness and the effectiveness of the work being done to tackle it by the voluntary sector and by Local Authorities. It is currently hearing selected oral evidence but it is still open to late submissions if you want to send one.

The second is the independent review of homelessness legislation published on26th April by Crisis. Again this is an in depth review by experts from across the spectrum of Local Authorities and third sector organisations. The focus here is on the legal duties owed to homeless people in England. Even though there is not complete agreement about the recommendations there is broad consensus and the appendix proposes detailed amendments to the current legislative position including the institution of a duty to prevent homelessness.

So far so good – and perhaps you are all thinking that we have been here before. The third element though is a minister who is engaging both with the sector and with the not so usual suspects. Marcus Jones may have got off to a rocky start at Homeless Link’s conference in 2015 but he has made up for it since. He has read the reports, visited projects, talked to people with experience of homelessness and seems to be genuinely committed to finding better ways to prevent people becoming homeless in the first place. Of course this is all on the back of changes that have already taken place in Scotland and are underway in Wales, but I don’t mind if we English are followers rather than leaders here so long as we get there in the end.

A difficult read but important – how can we get this message across?

I’ve spent the last couple of years working on this toolkit – travelling round the country meeting women experiencing poverty, sharing what I know about homelessness and housign need and trying to inspire people to take action. I hope lots of you will download and read this report and take up the challenge!

A Fair Say

Women and PovertyIn this guest blog, the National Board for Catholic Women introduce their new resource, The Toolkit to Combat Women’s Poverty.

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Chilling analysis by Red Brick – which shows why we need to argue the case for housing as a public good…

Red Brick

Requiring governments to run budget surpluses earned the headlines from the Chancellor’s Mansion House speech. But few noticed that he also wants to ditch the principle that borrowing is the best way to fund capital investment.

The reasons for borrowing to invest are obvious: it enables the project to be done now, when it’s needed, and the costs are spread over the project’s life, with accountants following familiar rules to ensure that expected income will more than meet the costs of the debt. Gordon Brown enshrined the principle in the term ‘prudential borrowing’, which has applied in local government since 2003. The rules then encoded by CIPFA have been followed for 12 years without any apparent breach. Any council investment must follow the CIPFA code, with council housing uniquely limited since April 2012 by additional, Treasury-imposed borrowing caps. Nevertheless, the system has begun to produce results for housing. In the…

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There is a story about how, if you put a frog in a pot of cold water and slowly bring it to the boil, the frog doesn’t realise its danger until the water is close to boiling and the poor reptile has died. This is a really good analogy for the slow build-up of Britain’s housing crisis over the last 35 years. For most of the population – people who own their homes outright, are buying with a mortgage taken out some time ago, or who rent from their Local Authority or a Housing Association – the facts of the national housing crisis do not impinge on their daily lives.

There are three inter-related aspects to it – we do not have sufficient homes for the needs of our population; the homes we have are too expensive (whether to rent or to buy); we are not building new homes at a fast enough rate. None of these issues has been successfully tackled by any Government of any persuasion since the mid-seventies – and I have to admit to having little confidence that the plans put forward by the current Conservative Government will be any more likely to solve the problem.

So if we cannot rely on the Government to resolve the housing crisis, what can we do? If there was a single silver bullet it would surely have been deployed by now. Pretty much everything has been tried apart from massive investment by central government and that seems an unlikely prospect before 2020. So the answer is must be that we need to pick up on all the small (or even medium-sized)things that individuals, Housing Associations, Local Authorities, churches and communities can do. The focus has to be on incremental changes rather than big bold solutions; and, I think, on partnerships rather than solo developments.

It is no secret that many Housing Associations have been founded by churches or by groups of Christians, or that Christian philanthropists (think of Rowntree, Leverhulme and Octavia Hill) have been behind many of the innovations in social housing provision from the dissolution of the monasteries onwards. Inspired by this and encouraged by Archbishop Justin Welby’s speech to the National Federation,  Housing Justice have worked with the Centre for Theology and Community,  (funded by Chapter 1 and Quaker Housing Trust) to research and publish a report called, “Our Common Heritage”, which sets out the possibilities that could be realised if we can build on the shared heritage of the churches and of Housing Associations. In the report we identify six practical ways in which Housing Associations and churches are already working together and which could be replicated more widely:

  • Building social housing on church land (e.g. converting redundant church or vicarage sites)
  • Involving Church volunteers in support for Housing Association residents (everything from parent and toddler groups to job clubs)
  • Addressing the spiritual needs of Housing Association tenants (this often already happens for residents of supported housing for the elderly)
  • Campaigning together on housing issues (locally and nationally – and note that most church congregations include some Council members…)
  • Providing social housing for key church workers (e.g. youth workers)
  • Church investment in housing provision (an ideal form of ethical investment).

But it’s all very well to list what can be done – and even to give examples – the real question is how do we make this happen; how can we nudge, inspire and enable people and churches to join with Housing Associations to tackle the Britain’s housing crisis? One of the biggest barriers we found was ignorance – neither churches nor Housing Associations know enough about the other to think of them as natural partners.

I think there is a two step process needed here. The first step is to share information and stories about the reality of the crisis. The more we can talk about real life experiences of housing need and housing unaffordability, the more real the housing crisis will become for those who are lucky enough to have a secure home that meets their needs and that they can afford to pay for. The second step is for Housing Associations to consciously seek to work in partnership with churches and other faith communities, to do what we can. Housing Justice stands ready to facilitate these small steps that will begin to make the housing crisis history.

For more information or to download the report go to www.housingjustice.org.uk or call 020 3544 8094.

The latest figure for the number of rough sleepers in England was released on 26th February – as expected, at 2,744 it was higher than the 2013 number of 2,414 (by 14%). In any event it is only a snapshot of the number of people counted sleeping rough on one night in November in some Local Authority areas, plus estimates from those areas who decided not to carry out a count. In some ways the estimates are a more reliable indicator of the problem than the actual counts because they are based on intelligence drawn from a range of sources across the community including both official homelessness services, voluntary projects and parishes who come into contact with homeless people, for example folk sleeping in church porches or calling at the presbytery door for assistance. The real number of people who need help because they are homeless or in danger of being made homeless is much higher than the number who can be found sleeping on the streets. A rigorous research project funded by Crisis and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has been monitoring homelessness and its causes in England, Scotland and Wales since 2012. Their latest report for England has recently been published and that found 280,000 people were homeless or on the verge of homelessness in 2013/14.

Of course volunteers in church homelessness projects like night shelters and day centres or drop-ins don’t need to be told that the problem is getting worse. They can tell you from their own experience of the people they have been trying to help. This winter I have been volunteering in my local night shelter – sometimes sleeping over in the church hall with our homeless guests and sometimes serving breakfasts. Since November I have seen the number of people needing our shelter creep up from 15 to 22. That may not seem like a big increase but we are just one of about 90 similar shelters across England and Wales – and the statistics we collect centrally at Housing Justice suggest that this pattern is being repeated in other places.

Very few night shelter guests fit the stereotype of homeless people. The vast majority are people who are just down on their luck rather than alcoholics or drug addicts. Some of them are holding down jobs so that they can save a deposit to rent a flat, and one brave 18 year old in our shelter is at school studying for A levels. Official statistics show that many more people are becoming homeless just because their tenancy in the private rented sector has come to the end of its term and they are unable to find anywhere else they can afford in time to move in an orderly way. Changes to the benefits system are not helping, especially for people under 35 who receive much less State help with housing costs than they did before 2010. At the same time cuts to Local Authority budgets mean that their services to help homeless people are much reduced. This is where the Church is coming into its own. Without the services – night shelters, day centres, drop-ins, mentoring and befriending, hosting schemes – that parishes are providing people would be homeless for longer, would not get the help they need to find and keep proper accommodation, and more people would be dying homeless on our streets. The scary thing is that the problem is getting worse and so we need to do even more. Could you volunteer in a night shelter next year?