Posts Tagged ‘Faith in Affordable Housing’

There is a story about how, if you put a frog in a pot of cold water and slowly bring it to the boil, the frog doesn’t realise its danger until the water is close to boiling and the poor reptile has died. This is a really good analogy for the slow build-up of Britain’s housing crisis over the last 35 years. For most of the population – people who own their homes outright, are buying with a mortgage taken out some time ago, or who rent from their Local Authority or a Housing Association – the facts of the national housing crisis do not impinge on their daily lives.

There are three inter-related aspects to it – we do not have sufficient homes for the needs of our population; the homes we have are too expensive (whether to rent or to buy); we are not building new homes at a fast enough rate. None of these issues has been successfully tackled by any Government of any persuasion since the mid-seventies – and I have to admit to having little confidence that the plans put forward by the current Conservative Government will be any more likely to solve the problem.

So if we cannot rely on the Government to resolve the housing crisis, what can we do? If there was a single silver bullet it would surely have been deployed by now. Pretty much everything has been tried apart from massive investment by central government and that seems an unlikely prospect before 2020. So the answer is must be that we need to pick up on all the small (or even medium-sized)things that individuals, Housing Associations, Local Authorities, churches and communities can do. The focus has to be on incremental changes rather than big bold solutions; and, I think, on partnerships rather than solo developments.

It is no secret that many Housing Associations have been founded by churches or by groups of Christians, or that Christian philanthropists (think of Rowntree, Leverhulme and Octavia Hill) have been behind many of the innovations in social housing provision from the dissolution of the monasteries onwards. Inspired by this and encouraged by Archbishop Justin Welby’s speech to the National Federation,  Housing Justice have worked with the Centre for Theology and Community,  (funded by Chapter 1 and Quaker Housing Trust) to research and publish a report called, “Our Common Heritage”, which sets out the possibilities that could be realised if we can build on the shared heritage of the churches and of Housing Associations. In the report we identify six practical ways in which Housing Associations and churches are already working together and which could be replicated more widely:

  • Building social housing on church land (e.g. converting redundant church or vicarage sites)
  • Involving Church volunteers in support for Housing Association residents (everything from parent and toddler groups to job clubs)
  • Addressing the spiritual needs of Housing Association tenants (this often already happens for residents of supported housing for the elderly)
  • Campaigning together on housing issues (locally and nationally – and note that most church congregations include some Council members…)
  • Providing social housing for key church workers (e.g. youth workers)
  • Church investment in housing provision (an ideal form of ethical investment).

But it’s all very well to list what can be done – and even to give examples – the real question is how do we make this happen; how can we nudge, inspire and enable people and churches to join with Housing Associations to tackle the Britain’s housing crisis? One of the biggest barriers we found was ignorance – neither churches nor Housing Associations know enough about the other to think of them as natural partners.

I think there is a two step process needed here. The first step is to share information and stories about the reality of the crisis. The more we can talk about real life experiences of housing need and housing unaffordability, the more real the housing crisis will become for those who are lucky enough to have a secure home that meets their needs and that they can afford to pay for. The second step is for Housing Associations to consciously seek to work in partnership with churches and other faith communities, to do what we can. Housing Justice stands ready to facilitate these small steps that will begin to make the housing crisis history.

For more information or to download the report go to www.housingjustice.org.uk or call 020 3544 8094.

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Housing in Britain is in crisis. We have a broken housing market where even rising prices – e.g. in London – do not cause sufficient homes to be built to satisfy our needs (every year around 100,000 more households are created than new homes are built). There are not enough homes of the right size in the right places at a genuinely affordable cost. So homes lie empty in one area while families live in appallingly overcrowded conditions in another. Private rents are rising out of control, subsidised by Housing Benefit, and more and more people are being evicted when their short-term tenancies end. The so called Bedroom Tax penalises people in social housing even when there are no smaller properties for them to move into. And changes to the benefit system are contributing to homelessness and housing insecurity.
Against this backdrop Housing Justice is helping parishes across the country take practical steps to make a difference. We know It’s a huge problem but it is one where even a small parish or joint churches project can make a big difference.
Ever since the Catholic Housing Aid Society was founded in 1956 we have been pursuing our vision – that everyone should have a home that truly meets their needs. Over the years we’ve changed our activities to meet the changing needs of people who need help with their housing. Where rough sleeping and sofa surfing are a big problem Housing Justice can help set up a Night Shelter to provide basic accommodation and food through the winter months – and link the shelter guests into local services to help them move off the street into proper accommodation. There are around 50 church and community Night Shelters across England and Wales but more are needed. (You can see some videos about Night Shelters in action on our website: http://goo.gl/cZnXK.)
Folk are always willing to help but often need some guidance about the best way to do so. That’s why every year Housing Justice trains thousands of volunteers who go on to help in Night Shelters, soup kitchens, day centres and drop ins. The next stage though is providing help for people who have just moved off the streets and into housing. Our Mentoring and Befriending project trains and supports volunteers (and helps set up new projects) to be mentors and befrienders for people who are newly housed. The volunteers help people settle in to their new life and new community in practical ways, doing things like negotiating the process of opening a bank account, writing an attractive CV, finding work or volunteering opportunities, and building new social circles. We run our own scheme in London (new volunteers are always welcome) and support projects across the country.
There are even ways in which a parish can make a difference to the supply of genuinely affordable housing in its community. The biggest contribution is through the work of our Faith in Affordable Housing team, Judith Derbyshire and Sharon Lee. These two dynamic women support parishes, dioceses and religious orders through the process of converting empty churches, presbyteries and other buildings into new social housing. There are some great examples of what can be achieved here: http://goo.gl/fpDmC. But if you don’t have a building or any land to spare there are still ways to have an impact. Even one person taking in a lodger or a buy-to-let landlord deciding to rent to a family claiming benefits or at a lower than market rent will make a difference to people living in your community.
If this article has inspired you to find out more a representative of Housing Justice will be pleased to come and talk to you, your group, your church or local churches together organisation. Or you can come to see us at one of the Roadshows we are holding this year. The first one is in Liverpool on 22nd May, then Birmingham on 12th June, and Rayleigh (Essex) on 28th June. At the roadshows there will be a chance to find out about the problem locally and nationally as well as to be informed about how you can make a difference.
Contact us on 0203544 8094 or email info@housingjustice.org.uk.
Website: http://www.housingjustice.org.uk